A Review Of “The Vineyard We Knew” …

Originally posted on MV Obsession:

If you’re looking for a summer read about the adventures of a summer kid growing up on the Vineyard in Oak Bluffs  in the 50’s and 60’s…. this book is for you.

Even if you’re not on the Vineyard and just want to read a really, really charming,  and interesting book, this book is for you.

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My creation

I just finished reading this book “The Vineyard We Knew: by Kevin Parham . I enjoyed it immensely because like Kevin, I too was a summer kid on the Vineyard in Oak Bluffs during the 50’s and early 60’s. Our paths never crossed, and even though I’m quite a bit older than Kevin, we did do some of the same things and go to the same places. Flying Horses, Darling’s popcorn, Oak Bluffs beach (now known as the Inkwell) but I only knew it as … the beach … lol. If you enjoy stepping…

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Vineyard Gazette Book Review – The Vineyard We Knew – A Recollection of Summers on Martha’s Vineyard

 The Vineyard We Knew—A Recollection of Summers on Martha’s Vineyard

is Now Available!

 

                                                                                                                                                Martha’s Vineyard Isn’t Just for the Rich and Famous. . .

(Boston, MA)  When one thinks of Martha’s Vineyard, what often comes to mind are images of movie stars, politicians, and power-brokers—all living the leisurely life of ostentatious opulence.

However, long before Ted Kennedy drove his car off Dike Bridge on Chappaquiddick in 1969, and the tourist explosion of the 1980s, this once-remote Island was where a scant number of working-class families escaped the drudgery of everyday life.

The Vineyard We Knew will take you on a memorable trip back in time.  It’s a candid, yet engaging story about summers on Martha’s Vineyard during the turbulent 1960s as seen through the eyes of a young boy, his siblings, and cousins who navigate the challenges of a humble existence while under the aegis of their strict grandmother.

This book is for those who know and love the island of Martha’s Vineyard, as well as anyone with fond memories of their youthful summers.

 

Nikki Giovanni—acclaimed poet, author, and educator, praised The Vineyard We Knew as “A totally wonderful look at a community that has been much too silent about its contribution and possibilities.”

Author Thomas Dresser stated: “These passionate memoirs, written in a fluid style, capture the appeal of the Vineyard.”

 

Kevin Parham is an author and professional musician who spent every summer as a child on Martha’s Vineyard. As a result, he knows the island as well as can anyone not born and raised there.

Pre-publication copies of “The Vineyard We Knew” are available at: www.priapublishing.com

 

The Vineyard We Knew by Kevin Parham – First edition (5.25 X 8) 318 pages, 33 illustrations ISBN: 978-0-98494-850-5

 

                                                                                                                                                                                         

Realizing Your True Potential

Clear Your Mind of CAN'T

Throughout the course of our lives, we are constantly faced with having to make decisions—some of which are important and could potentially affect our future, while others are inconsequential, and, as a result, are limited in scope.

Many times, however, we resort to accepting the notions of ‘luck’, ‘hope’, ‘fate’, or ‘what is meant to be’, only to find ourselves wishing for the best possible outcome. And how often has an outcome fallen short of expectations?

What many of us fail to recognize is that we are in many respects the architects of our destiny. The very nature of our thoughts, be they positive or negative, can often have a profound effect on future results…but how many of us believe that we can actually influence those results simply by changing how we think?

The ONLY impediment to realizing your true potential is you.

Therefore, if you truly believe in yourself and can clear your mind of the word “CAN’T” and replace it with “I Shall”, then nothing will keep you from reaching your God-given potential.

‘The Vineyard We Knew—A Recollection of Summers on Martha’s Vineyard’

Hello Everyone -

I sometimes think of how fortunate we are to have this forum as a means of communicating with one another. It’s inspiring to see the admiration that many of us have for the island of Martha’s Vineyard—it’s truly a special place.

I’ve been visiting the Vineyard almost every summer for over fifty years, and, as a result, I have a lifetime of memories from my experiences there—some of which I’ve documented in my new book:

‘The Vineyard We Knew—A Recollection of Summers on Martha’s Vineyard’

Coming Soon!

Coming Soon!

It’s an engaging story about the time I had spent on the Vineyard as a young boy during the 1960s.

Pre-publication copies of the book will be available beginning May 6, 2014 at: http://www.priapublishing.com.

The Official Publication Date for the book is July 19, 2014.  We’ll be kicking off a campaign to launch the book soon, and we’d love to have you join us!

For more information about this exciting event, please visit:

http://www.thevineyardweknew.com.

http://www.priapublishing.com

 

There, you can sign up to receive updates and other announcements.

Thanks to you all!

Best regards,
Kevin

Imagination

Imagination

It is a known fact that anything tangible began as a mere thought…

And thoughts are powerful things…

Therefore, we are limited only by the boundaries we set for ourselves.

Do not limit your potential…dare to dream BIG dreams…

For if you allow your IMAGINATION to fly free…

There’s nothing in this world that you cannot accomplish!

Be Thankful. . .

BE THANKFUL. . .

Have You Ever Wondered What LIFE is All About?

As They Say, Money Isn’t Everything…

Money Isn’t Everything…

  • It can buy you a bed—but not sleep
  • It can buy you a clock—but not time
  • It can buy you a book—but not knowledge
  • It can buy you a position—but not respect
  • It can buy you medicine—but not health

Though research consistently shows that the more money people have, the more likely they are to report being satisfied with their lives, the data is slanted. Though money buys you things that make life easier and more satisfying and the easier your life, that relationship isn’t entirely linear, since there’s a limit to how much wealth can please you.

The happiness benefit of an increasing income is especially powerful among people who don’t have much money to start with, and diminishes as wealth increases. But studies also reveal that as average income levels have risen over time — in the U.S. and European nations, for example — residents of those countries have not reported being any happier than people were 30 or 40 years ago. It’s a paradox that while income and happiness may be associated within a population at any given moment, overall economic growth does not appear to correspond to a boost in national satisfaction over time.

Studies suggest, money matters, but only up to a point. Become rich enough, and a bigger paycheck no longer leads to more happiness. However an individual’s rank, or status, appears to be a stronger predictor of happiness than absolute wealth. The higher a person ranked within his age group or neighborhood, the more status he had and the happier he was regardless of how much he made in dollars (or, in the study’s case, pounds).

~ Tom R.

Resources

The New Science of Happiness http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1015902,00.html

Study: Money Isn’t Everything — But Status Is!

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1974718,00.html

HALLOWEEN

 Over the centuries, Halloween has had any number of names, interpretations, and meanings associated with it.  Whether you choose to call it ‘All Hallows Eve, The Eve of All Saints’ Day, or as in the case of modern days, Halloween, it basically boils down to one common theme—and that is the chance to wear outrageous costumes, and for one night, act out your wildest imaginative fantasy in ways that would otherwise be deemed as unacceptable or immature.  For kids, it represents a time of fun and excitement, dressing up as princesses, butterflies, and superheroes and receiving bags full of tasty treats that would make any dentist smile with glee. 

Regardless of what it has been referred to, this special evening has been considered to be one of the most magical evenings of the year.  It’s an evening of power and uninhibited fun; it’s a time when the spiritual and material worlds collide momentarily, when the veil separating the here and the hereafter is believed to be at its most narrow juncture.       

I was raised in a blue-collar neighborhood not far from Boston, Massachusetts.  When I was young, Halloween was celebrated at a time when there were no huge shopping malls and hardly any commercialization. We created simple costumes out of anything that happened to be lying around the house, and trick-or-treating was a mad dash to see how many houses we could visit in the allotted time to fill up our brown paper bags with candy. 

Our Community Center held pie-eating contests, we bobbed for apples, carved pumpkins, and sometimes enjoyed hayrides.  And a local car dealership even handed out free ‘Hoodsies’ (a small paper cup filled with vanilla and chocolate ice cream, with a wooden spoon attached under the cover). 

Of course, celebrating Halloween during my adolescent years wasn’t without a modicum of mischief, either. I had certainly engaged in behavior unbecoming a responsible young man, such as throwing raw eggs at passing cars, writing on objects with shaving crème, taking pumpkins from front porches and rolling them down hilly streets, breaking them into many pieces, and even taking candy from other trick-or-treaters because I was too lazy to collect my own—activities that I now regret having been part of.    

While attending Salem State College, located in ‘Witch City’ of Salem Mass, where Halloween is a serious, week-long ritual, I was indoctrinated as to the historical significance of this esteemed observance each year.  It could best be described as a homecoming where thousands of ghouls and goblins descend upon this north shore community to share camaraderie for a common, fun-filled purpose. 

Whether you believe in ghosts or the supernatural is irrelevant; what’s most important is that you make Halloween a safe and fun celebration for all!

 

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!

 

 

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