Finding Opportunities


“With everything that has happened to you, you can either feel sorry for yourself or treat what has happened as a gift.

Everything is either an opportunity to grow, or, and obstacle to keep you from growing.

You get to choose.”


—Wayne W. Dyer



Read . . . and then, Write


“Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, the good and bad, and see how they do it.

Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. READ!

And then write.

If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, then throw it out the window.”


—William Faulkner

The Intrinsic Value of a Book


“A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called “leaves”) imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time–proof that humans can work magic.”

—Carl Sagan


The Mystique of Lighthouses

Having lived in New England for most of my life, I’ve developed an affinity for lighthouses. Whether it’s the Portland Head Light in Maine, the Boston Harbor lighthouses, the five lighthouses on Martha’s Vineyard: (East Chop, West Chop, Gay Head, Edgartown, and Cape Poge), or the hundreds of others that dot the eastern seaboard . . . it matters not.

For, even at the tender age of 62 — though still young at heart — I find these timeless structures not only fascinating, but also fraught with stories that are limited only by one’s imagination. If lighthouses could talk, can you imagine what they might reveal?

What is it about a lighthouse that beckons us to it?

A rhetorical question, you say? Perhaps.  But, is it not possible that the attraction lies in not knowing?

I happened upon an interesting article about lighthouses and lighthouse keepers . . . check it out.